Changes between Version 22 and Version 23 of Hardware/dInfrastructure/qPowerMeasurment


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Timestamp:
08/29/13 15:39:13 (6 years ago)
Author:
pavan717
Comment:

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  • Hardware/dInfrastructure/qPowerMeasurment

    v22 v23  
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    44 Once the current is stepped down by the toroid, a 42Ω resister is used to convert the AC current into AC voltage at the entrance of the Power Sensing Platform. Then the AC voltage is converted to DC voltage by going through AD737JNZ chip with a average off-set of 3.364mV between the input and output of the chip. The voltage regulator is used to lower the voltage that powers the AD737JNZ chip to values of ± 2.5V from ± 3.3V.  The inverting amplifier with a gain of 4.7 is used to convert the negative voltage value outputted from the AD737JNZ chip to a positive value because the Arduino does not accept negative inputs. Once the signal enters the Arduino analog pins, the Arduino will read the signal at the analog pin and output a resolution reading between 0 to 1023. The Arduino has a 10-bit analog to digital converter (ADC) so it will map input voltages between 0 and 5 volts into integer values between 0 and 1023. In this project I have used the internal built in voltage of 1.1V instead of the normal 5V in the Arduino board. This change will map the resolution reading between 0 to 1023 for 0 to 1.1V. Then the software part of this project will fix the off-set of the AD737JNZ chip and the scaling factor of the toroid along with adjusting the Arduino to covert the resolution readings to power readings.         
     44Once the current is stepped down by the toroid, a 42Ω resister is used to convert the AC current into AC voltage at the entrance of the Power Sensing Platform. Then the AC voltage is converted to DC voltage by going through AD737JNZ chip with a average off-set of 3.364mV between the input and output of the chip. The voltage regulator is used to lower the voltage that powers the AD737JNZ chip to values of ± 2.5V from ± 3.3V.  The inverting amplifier with a gain of 4.7 is used to convert the negative voltage value outputted from the AD737JNZ chip to a positive value because the Arduino does not accept negative inputs. Once the signal enters the Arduino analog pins, the Arduino will read the signal at the analog pin and output a resolution reading between 0 to 1023. The Arduino has a 10-bit analog to digital converter so it will map input voltages between 0 and 5 volts into integer values between 0 and 1023. In this project I have used the internal built in voltage of 1.1V instead of the normal 5V in the Arduino board. This change will map the resolution reading between 0 to 1023 for 0 to 1.1V. Then the software part of this project will fix the off-set of the AD737JNZ chip and the scaling factor of the toroid along with adjusting the Arduino to covert the resolution readings to power readings.         
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    102102'''Current Progress:'''
    103103
    104 The ORBIT grid has total of 400 nodes out of them 301 are functional and 99 are not functional. They all are connected to total of 34 breaker switches, approximately 12 nodes to a breaker switch. One Power Sensing Arduino board can only take in 12 breaker switches out of 34, therefore the current sensor has only the first 12 breaker switches connected covering the area shown in the black box below: [[BR]]   
     104The ORBIT grid has total of 400 nodes out of them 301 are functional and 99 are not functional. All nodes are connected to total of 34 breaker switches, approximately 12 nodes to a breaker switch. One Power Sensing Arduino board can only take in 12 breaker switches out of 34, therefore the current sensor has only the first 12 breaker switches connected covering the area shown in the black box below: [[BR]]   
    105105
    106106|| [[Image(Node Mapping.PNG, 400px)]] ||
     
    108108[[BR]]
    109109
    110 The numbers in the blue circle above represent each outlet, approximately 3 outlets are connected to a single breaker switch.  The outlets are numbered because they have to be mapped to the proper breaker switch. Because 4 nodes are connected to a single outlet, the mapping was done by turning on/off 4 nodes at a single outlet and reading & recording the power the spike at any breaker switch to determine which breaker switch was connected to which outlet. [[BR]]
     110The numbers in the blue circle above represent each outlet, approximately 3 outlets are connected to a single breaker switch.  The outlets are numbered because the outlets have to be mapped to the proper breaker switch. Because 4 nodes are connected to a single outlet, the mapping was done by turning on/off 4 nodes at a single outlet and reading & recording the power the spike at any breaker switch to determine which breaker switch was connected to which outlet. [[BR]]
    111111
    112112|| [[Image(Mapping Results.PNG, 300px)]] ||
     
    122122'''Future Work:'''
    123123
    124 As this project continues 3 more sensors circuits will be required to cover rest of the ORBIT grid and the remaining 22 breaker switches will have to be mapped to their proper outlets. Once the entire ORBIT grid is connected the power reading will have to be deaggregated to determine the power status of each node individually. This is because each breaker switch has up to 12 nodes connected to it, deaggregting this data will help answer the following questions and many more:
     124For future work and development of this project, 3 more sensors circuits will be required to cover rest of the ORBIT grid and the remaining 22 breaker switches will have to be mapped to their proper outlets. Once the entire ORBIT grid is connected the power reading will have to be deaggregated to determine the power status of each node individually. This is because each breaker switch has up to 12 nodes connected to it, deaggregting this data will help answer the following questions and many more:
    125125[[BR]]   
    1261261) Total displacement for all nodes.[[BR]]